Danger! Carnivores!

Because glazing of the limery is not complete, if has turned into a trap for flies – despite the huge hole in the door, the flies only seem to be able to get in and not to get out. On the other hand, butterflies and damselflies seem able to exit without a problem. One of the builders noticed the current fly infestation and asked whether I might get some carnivorous plants. It wasn’t something I had planned to do, but I thought it was a good idea. So, without further ado I searched the internet, placed an order and today the limery has seven new occupants:

Dionaea muscipula - Venus flytrap

Dionaea muscipula – Venus flytrap

Dionaea muscipula 'Akai Ryu' - Venus flytrap 'Red Dragon'

Dionaea muscipula ‘Akai Ryu’ – Venus flytrap ‘Red Dragon’

Drosera capensis - Cape sundew and Drosera capensis alba - white Cape sundew

Drosera capensis – Cape sundew and Drosera capensis alba – white Cape sundew

Utricularia bisquamata 'Betty's Bay'

Utricularia bisquamata ‘Betty’s Bay’

Sarracenia purpurea venosa

Sarracenia purpurea venosa

Nepenthes ventricosa x talangensis

Nepenthes ventricosa x talangensis

One of the sundews has already caught a fly (look closely at the one on the right and you’ll see it), but they have a long way to go yet…

We have glass in the roof (but not the door) and lots and lots of flies

We have glass in the roof (but not the door) and lots and lots of flies

I’m so excited at the prospect of growing these (and other) unusual plants.

 

 

 

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31 Comments

  1. And I would love to hear all about. Tried it so many times and managed to kill more plants than flies…ah well no, but you get the idea! What is a limery? An internet search did not make me any wiser. Have a lovely weekend, Johanna

    Reply
  2. Well what a clever idea if it works. We get more than a few flies on account of the free range chicken farm a quarter of a mile away. It would beat having to watch Mr E stalking flies swat in hand!

    Reply
    • I think they’d explode if they managed to catch all the flies that are currently in there (thanks, I think to the cows in the field just behind the garden). Anyway, I thought it would be a fun thing to try.

      Reply
  3. Had no idea you coud buy them on the Internet. Years ago, we found a colony of fly eating plants with trumpet like flowers along Little River in Alabama. Yours look quite spectacular. I’m sure they’ll make short work of the flies.

    Reply
  4. I wonder if it’s possible to get carnivorous plants large enough to deal with 4″ grasshoppers…? Perhaps not. I’ll leave them for the eventual arrival of our chickens.

    Reply
  5. ceramicssing

     /  July 10, 2015

    Hi this is Joanna, how are you? I have made your buttons. Sorry they are so late. I have had a lot of family problems. Anyway, if you don’t want them or don’t like them there is no obligation to buy. All the best Thanks Joanna

    Reply
  6. Well, there’s an odd event that has sent you swinging off in a new direction….. the limery has already influenced your growing decisions and might be just the right climate for a healthy colony of fly-eaters. They are such odd plants and have always vaguely scared me. I had a friend who got a couple once, many years ago now, to reduce her fly population and all the flies just up and left and her plants died of starvation. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  7. I love the look of the Nepenthes ventricosa x talangensis. I envy you your Nepenthes ventricosa x talangensis.

    Reply
  8. They are magnificent! How do the purple and yellow ones trap their prey? I have seen all the other species, and so understand them, but not those.

    Reply
    • The purple and yellow ones only catch tiny insects in the soil, so really they won’t do me any good! Their common name is ‘bladderwort’ and they have little bladder-shaped insect traps beneath the soil. This plant was included in the “package” with the others… I rather like the tiny snap-dragon flowers.

      Reply
  9. Adventures in exotic horticulture begin!

    Reply
    • I’m not sure that I’m sufficiently obsessive to give them the care they need! Anyway, it will be a fun experiment. Apparently, the main thing they need is light and I have that in abundance!

      Reply
  10. That was really interesting. Your post made me wonder if there is a mosquito eating plant. I also enjoyed your link re new species identified in the Philippines. I have work to do but it must wait while I google…..hee hee. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  11. ps. Have your read “The signature of all things by Elizabeth Gilbert?” I really enjoyed reading about the heroines work on mosses. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  12. Great (organic) idea! Wonder if they eat mosquitoes?

    Reply
  13. I don’t believe it – the Venus Flytrap has eaten my ham and cheese sandwich!

    Reply

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