This one is for Tammie

It’s very easy when posting on the internet to show only our successes – the beautiful children, pristine kitchens, the perfect meal, the Shetland lace shawl, the abundant garden… ah, yes, the abundant garden.

Well, it’s true that my garden and the limery do contain lots of lovely crops. Currently there’s lettuce, piles of raspberries and the promise of peppers, chillies, courgettes, lemons, limes, red currants, blueberries, apples, mange tout, kale, broccoli, ginger and potatoes…

BUT… there are also dead bean plants, dead rosemary, rocket and mizuna that flowered before we had a chance to eat any, the world’s saddest sage plant, brassicas munched by caterpillars and huge swathes of weeds.

So, Tammie – fear not, we all have gardening disasters… we just don’t often ‘fess up to them!

And, just to make you all smile, it takes lots of effort to get all those perfect shots of a life…

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35 Comments

  1. Funny!!!! Loved the Instagram Husband. Thank you for sharing the tickly underbelly of your garden!

    Reply
  2. Annie

     /  June 20, 2017

    I’m so jealous of all you have in the limery, and so look forward to having the same successes next year in the Peach House. We are so pleased with it so far, and glad we went with the heat reflective glass. It really cools down the lounge, we can have the patio door open and not have the room heated with excess sunlight. We have failures too – the salads are not doing so well this year and half the peas didn’t germinate for some strange reason. The spuds are very slow – I guess the spring was just too dry for them, though the ones in the containers did great. We also have root crops for the first time, but still can’t get radishes to work for us. One apple tree is to become firewood this winter, as it failed to produce a single flower, and has been on the threatened list for 3 years, but we do have flowers on the sharron fruit. XXX

    Reply
    • I like the fact that there are no guarantees with gardening… we learn and we savour our successes. Oh and I couldn’t even photograph the parsnips which simply didn’t germinate!

      Reply
  3. It must be confession day today, I’ve shared photos of all my weeds too! I always feel a bit guilty when people comment how beautiful my garden is, I can be pretty selective in the bits I show 🙂 Your allotment is looking pretty productive!

    Reply
  4. shellssells

     /  June 20, 2017

    SO TRUE! We’ve lost, just this year, a rain tree and a witch hazel. We also lost a fothergilla, though we were able to replace that one free of charge, and the new one is doing very well. Mr. Ink pulled what he thought was a weed, but was one of his own double balloon flowers, and I pulled what I thought was a weed but was one of his Missouri Evening Primroses. The primrose survived, the double balloon flower did not. I was ashamed, and didn’t take ANY pictures of those gardening failures. I also have a bunch of ranunculus that look like they aren’t going to make it, though the ones I put in different pots look pretty good. And, I managed to accidentally save a bunch of caladium by not cleaning out my pots when I put those pots in the garage. I planted new plants this year, and now also have caladium coming up.

    Basically, gardening is a funny mystery. We can do everything right and have great or poor results. We can do everything wrong, and have great or poor results. But it’s a mystery that’s endlessly fascinating!

    Reply
    • You are so right. I know people who want to be certain that the things they plant will grow and give up straight away if they don’t, but that’s part of the joy to me. I love trying to cultivate a plant that’s hard. I seem to be the death of rosemary plants, but every year I buy a new one and try again… one day I’ll work out how to get them to love me!

      Reply
  5. Laurie Graves

     /  June 20, 2017

    Great points! No one’s life is perfect, that’s for sure, and as for gardens. Well, don’t get me started 😉 Especially about one bed, dry part sun/ part shade, afternoon sun, plenty of holes, lots of failures. And that Instagram Husband clip is a hoot!

    Reply
  6. Ha, I loved the Instagram Husband – ‘We used to eat our food, now we just take pictures of it’ I kind of feel that way about Instagram in general. I so like seeing the pics of your lush garden, I can see dead plants around here any time 🙂

    Reply
  7. Hmm..at first I thought, “oh wow, she really is human,” but I bet the truth is you tiptoed into someone else’s garden and took photos of their plant disasters. 😜😜😜

    Reply
  8. LOL the Instagram Husband! Who would have thought? Well, last year, there was a time I figured people might stop reading my blog if I didn’t say something nice about the annus horribilis of garden years. That pepper is bigger than my peppers. It must lead a better life.

    Reply
  9. How reassuring that your garden has dead things in it! But I am sure that if we all came to visit we would ooohhh and aaahhh over the beautiful peppers and raspberries and apples, and still ignore the ‘world’s saddest sage plant’. We look for the positives, not the messiness. In my garden I celebrate the things that DO thrive, and try to ignore the messy areas, overgrown correas and the dead bushes until I have the time to deal with them! Until that happens, and they are way down on the list of things to do, I will happily ignore them, both in photos and in real life!

    Reply
  10. Gardening is like an analogy for life. It can’t all be a stream of successes, we have different talents and skills, we all have bad patches, and small successes give us just as much pleasure as big ones. Rosemary and sage hate me, but basil is my best friend, also ginger, lemongrass and capsicums. I’ve given up fighting the grasshoppers, though, and anything that doesn’t volunteer and survive despite them doesn’t even get a look in 🙂

    Reply
  11. Hahaha! Instagram Husband! 😂 This was a fun post, although hopefully there won’t be too many more gardening mishaps for you to document this year. I have an interesting one myself – a dying mint plant!! Yes, you read that right… On that note, maybe we can start an alternative social network called Unstagram, where we share real life in all its lumpy, messy glory? 🤔

    Reply
    • Unstagram – I love it!
      My mum’s mint died a couple of years ago. We never found out why, but we were able to provide her with plenty of replacement plants which seem to be doing fine.

      Reply
      • Hmmm… Maybe mine is just a dud plant. It’s never really seemed to thrive. I might see if my parents have one I can “borrow”…

        Reply
  12. Sharon

     /  June 21, 2017

    If your rocket flowers, you can still make a delicious pesto from it. The taste that is overpowering in the fresh herb mellows nicely when blended up with oil, a few walnuts and a bit of lemon peel.

    Reply
  13. Instagram husband, love it, but blokes are just as bad. Yesterday we were having coffee, two blokes sat down, one of their phones rang, ten minutes chat, man looking self important, companion hacked off. Phone call ends, one minutes talking to each other, other chaps phone rings, he looks self important having a really important phone call, other chap starts playing games. Phone call ends, both chaps fiddle with phones . Turn the darn thinngs off and live a little.
    I think its good to share the ups and downs of life, especially if there is a happy ending!

    Reply
    • I really dislike mobile phones for exactly the situation you have described. Mr Snail and I never have ours switched on unless we want to make a call.

      Reply
  14. Haha I had a good giggle at the video! And I think it’s important to show that sometimes, things are not picture perfect. Success does taste sweeter if you have known failure too and not given up 😊

    Reply
    • And just to add insult to injury – a mole hill has appeared and the roots of one of the surviving beans has been pushed to the surface. It will be a miracle, never mind sweet, if I get any beans this year!

      Reply
      • Oh that’s just bad timing! It’s probably because you have lovely soft soil there, less work for them to make their hole!

        Reply

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