The frog princess

Sometimes you know when something is wrong.

Over the winter I crocheted most ofย a sweater. All the main pieces were done, it just needed the neck working up and sewing together. But I didn’t do it. It sat in my work basket for months whilst I made up excuses for not finishing it.

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nice wool, shame about the pattern

Finally, over the weekend, I got it out of the basket and looked at it. And admitted that I really didn’t like the shape – too long and skinny. In fact the pattern was for a man’s sweater and I should have taken this into account and adjusted it, but I didn’t, I followed the pattern. I should also have stopped working on it when I realised my tension was wrong and it was not as wide as it should have been for the number of stitches. For some reason, I pretended this wouldn’t matter as I worked and considered adding side panels… despite the fact that this would change the way the arms would have to be attached.. and their length… and their shape. And even knowing this, I followed the pattern for the arms too, so they weren’t going to work if I made the body wider. Is it any wonder that I couldn’t bring myself to finish it off?

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back to balls

On Saturday, however, I bit the bullet. I love the yarn and hate the way the pattern turned out. The only thing to do in such circumstances is to frog (unravel it for those of you who don’t do yarny stuff… because you “rip-it, rip-it”). So, with much sneezing (it had got dusty from all that sitting around), I converted it back into balls. I have plenty of yarn, so now I’m going to have fun choosing another pattern to work it up into… probably a cardigan or jacket. I have to admit that this is one of the reasons I like knitting and crochet better than sewing – the work can be completely dismantled and the raw material used again in its entirety if you don’t like the finished item or if it doesn’t fit.

 

-oOo-

This is another in my series of ‘honest’ posts, about things that don’t work or aren’t perfect. You can read my first one (about gardening) here. This is the anti-Instagram!

 

 

 

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49 Comments

  1. I have a shawl I just finished that I made from a blanket I was *almost* finished with but couldn’t complete because I just… didn’t like it. But I love the yarn. Frogging is a necessary evil when we keep going with projects we know aren’t right.

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  2. Me too! Been there, done that!

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  3. Oh I have laughed and laughed at this!!!

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  4. Frogs are wonderful things. It just takes a kiss to turn them into something wonderful, so bravo for steeling yourself for the ripit, ripit part. Now look! New yarn!

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  5. Well done for taking the bull (bullfrog maybe??) by the horns ๐Ÿ™‚

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  6. Annie

     /  July 18, 2017

    Frogging – love it. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  7. Well done on biting the bullet. For sure you will find a lovely new pattern.

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  8. I took a top down knitted cardigan round to my friend’s house a couple of weeks ago to ask her to help me frog it. The yarn is good stuff but there’s something amiss with the cardigan. It’s cropped to wear over a summer dress – fine! However, the yarn is quite thick – which doesn’t seem very summery. Also, there are darts. These are weird in a knitted garment in my opinion. I knew I would never wear it. Anyway, hours later, my friend realised that it was a top down cardigan and we’d been trying to frog it from the wrong end. I had told her it was a top down pattern but my French is obviously not as good as I thought it was ๐Ÿ˜ฆ Now also looking for a new pattern for a lovely mustard coloured wool rich yarn. We have fun don’t we?

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    • Well, at least I started frogging in the right direction, so that’s something. I’ve never worked a piece top-down, although Jude at my LYS swears by it as a technique when she’s not sure she will have enough yarn to do a full-length version of the thing she’s knitting… makes sense.

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  9. What is this gene that keeps us working on when we know it isn’t working out? I have three items sitting alone and unloved in the depths of a basket waiting to be resurrected – the trouble is I went ahead and sewed them all up despite knowing they weren’t right……… Duh!!

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  10. I may be soon be in the same place… oh well, better frogging and re-using the precious yarn than let it sit and collect dust?
    well done!

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  11. We are going to see the Divine Comedy perform next month, if they play this track I’ll think of you and your jumper!

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  12. oh this reminds me of a black wool jumper I had asked my nan to knit for me as a teenager. I had it on like twice. It was just too bulky, I felt like a big black potato. I finally bit the bullet 15 years later, apologized and told my grandma that I would like to do something else with the wool. But I did take care of the frogging and washing. Next step is a brainstorming to find something that really works with this thick black wool. Any ideas?

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  13. Big advocate of frogging!! That is the wonder of knitting or crochet. Dealing with a sewing fail however is not pretty ๐Ÿ˜œ

    Happy pattern choosing and yay for #anti-Instagram x

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  14. Well, it’s a lovely color of yarn and one day (like the Frog Prince) it will find it’s true match.

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  15. As I’m reading through all the comments, it seems this is quite common. Good for your for frogging the yarn and starting over. It will be fabulous the next go around. That color is gorgeous.

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  16. Oh, we’ve all been there! At least I now know I’m not the only one who keeps pressing on with a troublesome knit, despite all the warning signs. But as you say, a knitted project lends itself so much better to the “rip it up and start again” treatment than a sewn one! Good luck turning this yarn into something your really love ๐Ÿ˜€

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  1. And suddenly it’s autumn | The Snail of Happiness

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