Springing into life 2018

Today is the vernal equinox – the first day of ‘astronomical’ spring. Despite the late snow here in the UK, spring has arrived with glorious sunshine and I have been busy potting up some of the plants that have grown from the seeds I sowed back in January. As with all seed sowing there have been successes and failures – and a minor slug invasion at germination time did for a few of the seedlings. The loofah seeds have not germinated and neither have some of the varieties of chilli, but I have not given up hope yet and I they may eventually appear.

I sowed generous amounts of parsley seed because it is notoriously fickle when it comes to germination. It appears that every single seed, however, has produced a plant, so I will be able to share these with my local friends (a particular pleasure when it comes to gardening). Last year I planted another unreliable germinator – lemon grass. Again, I was swamped with plants and gave lots away. Since it grows to quite a size, I only retained three plants for myself and these have been happy in the limery over the winter. Today they have been transplanted to larger pots and I’m looking forward to fresh, home-grown lemongrass in my cooking for the first time this year.

A few weeks ago, before things in the limery had actively started to grow, I decided to divide some of my carnivores. This was a little nerve-wracking as I’ve never done it before and I was not sure how they would respond. Several weeks down the line, however, I’m happy to report that they seem to be thriving, and there are lots of new pitchers (for the Sarracenias) and sticky leaves (for the Droseras). Several of these plants are destined for a friend who lives locally, so I’m delighted that the operation has been so successful. The tatty old pitchers from last year (or even the year before) look very sad compared to the vigorous new ones. The plants that I didn’t split are also springing back into life and it looks like flies are going to have a very hard time if they come into the limery this year.

There’s still more potting up to do and plenty of new seeds to sow later on in the week. I love harvesting, but the promise of abundance at this time of year really does lift my spirits.

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18 Comments

  1. The snow has gone from here and the sun has shone, but the ground is beyond waterlogged it is positively drowning! Can’t wait to get outside again.

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    • Even our raised beds are soggy… which is quite an achievement. I am hoping, however, that we’ll have a break from the precipitation and I’ll be able to get out and start getting a bed ready for potato planting very soon. I think at the moment, though, the ground is too cold and wet.

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  2. I thought I had failed with all the cucurbits but it seems they were just staying safe in their compost until the weather improved! I too love seeing things germinating and the promise of feasts to come.

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    • I haven’t done any of my curcurbits yet apart from the loofahs – I try not to get carried away too early as I’ve been caught out in the past with plants ready before the weather is!

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  3. Me too Dr Snail! When I had a proper garden one of the great pleasures was the dividing up, re-potting and planting out and passing on the excess. It is a most satisfying activity! And I love seeing the tender new sprouts of spring too. Spring-green is one of my happy colours 🙂 I so want your loofah seeds to sprout. Fingers crossed!!

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  4. Murtagh's Meadow

     /  March 20, 2018

    You’ve definitely got green fingers!

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  5. I love the enthusiasm of Spring too. And the joy of being able to share gardening goodies with others. Our soil is so dry. It is ages since we have had any decent rain. Even my correas, which happily made it through the long drought, are looking stressed. Well done on dividing the carnivorous plants too. They seem to love the Limery.

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  6. I think maybe the loofahs do take a long time, and they like it warmish, so it might take a while longer…

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  7. Laurie Graves

     /  March 21, 2018

    So green and growing! Come, spring!

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  8. oh so sweet to see the seedlings sprouting.

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  9. So nice to see so much plant bounty in the limery. I am far behind you!!!

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  10. Ooh, I can’t wait to see the loofah plants grow (so they better germinate!!). I always have trouble getting chilis to sprout, so I’ve learned to wait until plants appear at the local nursery rather than endure the frustration. Glad to see your carnivorous plant success…I’ve never had a green thumb with them.

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  11. TP

     /  March 23, 2018

    Hi there,

    Have you tried to grow Kiwi from seeds before ? 🙂

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