Welsh Quilts

What a lovely day I had yesterday…

Some weeks ago Sue (Going Batty in Wales) mentioned to me that she wanted to go and see the summer exhibition at the Welsh Quilt Centre in Lampeter, and suggested that we go together. So, we met for coffee and then visited Red Apple Yarn before having an unexpectedly large lunch (the café we went to had run out of the soup I wanted) and then going to the exhibition.

The quilts on display represented the past ten years of summer exhibitions at the Quilt Centre and so we had the opportunity to see a wide variety – from Kaffe Fassett creations to Victorian quilts made from tiny scraps of reclaimed fabrics. There were examples made with flannel, beautiful cream coloured quilts made for Claridge’s in the 1940s and marketed through the Rural Industries Bureau, a single printed tree of life panel made in 1810 and paisley scarf quilts.

Whilst it’s hard to single out any one quilt, I did love the creations where the quilting itself was the star, and the cream Rural Industries Bureau quilts were perhaps the epitome of this, but I particularly liked the yellow quilt that I have featured some corner detail of above. The pattern in this demonstrates the traditional Welsh characteristic of a central design surrounded by borders comprising smaller motifs… or at least, so Sue tells me. The other quilt that really caught my attention was the Victorian patchwork one displayed on the bed… mainly because it featured a large mend (that I completely failed to photograph) where it had either been torn or worn along a fold. Several of the quilts had been repaired or had small unfinished sections and I was particularly drawn to these features that reminded me of the women who worked so hard to make and maintain these works of art.

Altogether it is an inspirational exhibition and we had a lovely day out. If you are visiting mid-Wales I highly recommend a trip to the Quilt Centre where the exhibition runs until November.

Previous Post
Leave a comment

32 Comments

  1. Beautiful quilts! Sounds like a lovely outing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Lovely! I went there some years ago right after the Festival of Quilts where they had a special about Welsh quilts, and I had a really nice day taking buses and trains through Wales as well as seeing the museum 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. It was a lovely day out. And I am so glad we went together – much nocer than going alone! And thank you for introducing me to Jude and Red Apple Yarns. I am feeling all inspired – but will it last until I have done a bit more gardening and have time?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. Aren’t they glorious and I liked the cream one with the yellow borders. I wonder how far it is from my brothers house.
    But what did you have for lunch? Was there cake?
    And did you buy wool?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • I had broccoli bake for lunch and I was too full for cake… I must be better organised next time. I didn’t buy wool, but Sue did.
      It’s really worth the trip… and you could visit the National Wool Museum which is not too far away too. And we could meet up and eat cake together!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. Beautiful work!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  6. Reblogged this on AT being me.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  7. I’m like you, I love quilts and all kinds catch my fancy. I admire quilters of all types too. I have tried my hand at quilting and felt I made a terrible botch of it and now I leave it to others to do. Sounds like a fabulous outing and so nice you had like-minded company too!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  8. A wonderful day made even lovelier (!) by quilts ❤

    Like

    Reply
  9. What I love about exhibitions like that is the lack of ‘unnatural perfection’. These quilts were all made by real women, with hands and hearts and what they had, and they weren’t bothered about the quilt police, or did they have the latest fabrics or pattern. If a quilt needed mending, they mended it and the quilt lived on. Historical quilts have something to teach all of us about what a quilt is for, and about creating beauty out of nothing very much.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • Yes, I don’t think many of them could be described as perfect and, in fact, the modern Kaffe Fassett quilts with their very straight seams and machine stitching were much less appealing (although beautiful) perhaps because they didn’t have the feeling of being personal.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  10. It was lovely to see these quilts, but what really stuck me was the way they were exhibited. Those little rooms, and the quilts on beds and hanging on the walls…..it must have emphasised the sense of these as items made for use at home, and helped you see the hands that made them.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  11. What a fun outing! Seeing all that wonderful work can jog our creativity as well. The amount of work in those quilts is incredible. Thanks for sharing them.

    Like

    Reply
  12. The Tree of Life is amazing, I’d really love to have that one. I’d dig out my burglar clothes but it would deprive a lot of people of the pleasure. What a lovely trip out.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

    Like

    Reply
    • The fabric came from India, but it wasn’t clear whether the printing was done there or in England… either way it was a beautiful single panel and in the most wonderful condition considering it was over 200 years old.

      Like

      Reply
  13. What a treat to see these! There’s one–a large red square, on its point, in a deep-colored background–that I would swear was Amish, from the US! I like the one you featured a lot–was that one quilted by hand? Wow . . .

    Like

    Reply
    • It may be Amish, but it may be a similar Welsh quilt (I can’t remember): the theme of the exhibition in 2012 was inspired by Dorothy Osler’s book; “Amish Quilts and the Welsh Connection” and that was one of the quilts that appeared in that exhibition.

      Like

      Reply
  14. Looks like a lovely day out – and plenty of places to rest if you get tired!

    Like

    Reply
  15. I have made many quilts in my time but never one even a fraction as gorgeous as any of these, all of which leave me in awe of both the skill and patience of the quilters.

    Like

    Reply
  16. Beautiful! Is this a permanent exhibition? I may have to persuade The Management that we need to visit.

    Like

    Reply

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: