In the limelight

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Excellent books – especially if you don’t want to make huge quantities.

Since Friday I’ve been very busy, on and off, with lime-related activities – zesting, juicing and freezing quite a lot of them. I loved the suggestion (from several of you) about making lime curd, but then dithered over which recipe to use. Finally, I settled on one from Marisa McClellan’s book Food in Jars (which I’m pretty sure was recommended to me by one of you two or three years ago). I chose this recipe because it suggests using a boiling water bath after putting the curd into the jars to extend the life to as long as four months, compared to the usual week or two (not that it’s likely to last four months in this house). Whilst looking for the recipe I browsed through Marisa’s other book Preserving by the Pint and discovered an interesting recipe for something called Caramelized Meyer Lemon Syrup – a sauce that she suggests drizzling over yoghurt or waffles. Basically you caramelize some sugar and then stir in lemon juice and zest – I decided to have a go at a lime version.

So, this morning I set to and zested, juiced, stirred, boiled and bottled and produced two small jars of Caramelized Lime Syrup and two of Zesty Lime Curd:

I was devastated to realize that I’d got slightly too much lime curd for the jars, so I was forced to consume the left-over bit on some toast for my lunch.

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Homemade bread and homemade lime curd, using eggs laid by our own hens.

I still have a dozen limes unprocessed and I think a lime drizzle cake is on the cards for the weekend.

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16 Comments

  1. I was interested to read about the storage time for your lime curd because I’ve been making lemon curd for about 20 years from an old (late 1970s) recipe book called ‘The Complete Book of Home Preserving’ by Mary Norwak and she suggests making small jars of it which will have a cupboard life of around 2 months. I definitely keep mine for that long – although in the fridge rather than a cupboard – and it’s always been fine. At least, nobody’s dropped dead yet!

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    • That’s interesting to know… it’s one of those things that I’m always rather cautious about. I have never used a water bath after bottling before, but the two jars have sealed with a pop so I think they would probably be good for a few months, as suggested in the book.

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  2. The lime curd sounds delicious and I feel your sacrifice having to eat it at lunch. Good tip about keeping it for longer.

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  3. I bet your house smelled wonderful during the making.

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  4. I haven’t made lemon curd for ages but have been given a few lemons so maybe… I use a recipe of my mothers which uses very little butter so probably was a wartime version. It certainly keeps well in the fridge. I think I tried it with limes years ago but I only buy them for G&T when my daughter is coming and usual freeze any left in wedges for when I am indulging without her. Enjoy the fruits of your labours.

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  5. I am awed by your ability to step up to the plate and consume what must be consumed without thought of the consequences. What a woman! Back in the days when I ate sugar I always had a jar of lemon curd in the fridge and often kept them for a month or two with nothing untoward occurring. I also spied a jar of organic lemon curd in the store the other day and was very tempted, your previous post jumped straight into my mind and I almost drooled as I read the ingredients. I may yet succumb 🙂

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  6. That sounds great, and the cake really gets my attention. I hope it gets made and enjoyed!

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  7. Oh you poor thing, having to eat that excess curd. It’s a tough job but somebody has to do it!
    I’ve got such a hankering for lemon curd on toast now…

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  8. Oh, the suffering must have been extreme… Do you want my recipe for lime zucchini (courgette) sponge, for later in the year when the zucchini are in season?

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  9. I hadn’t heard of that bok but will be checking the library for a copy.
    You have excelled yourself getting all of that done! I confess to lemon curd that is alleged to last a couple of months but has never been out to the test. I will see about maybe picking up lines next time I’m at Birmingham market. You’ve inspired me 😉

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  10. I think lemon curd is sort of self preserving, with all the sugar and all the acid, but it never lasts in my house either. I use Food in Jars all the time and really like her approach. The bread and butter pickles are fabulous in there. I may have to look into the other book, as well. Good for you, making an adornment for toast with your limes!

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  11. My Mum made lemon pudding when I was young. I think that’s a different thing, though. But last year I found out that Cooper’s Cafe in Skipton makes it and it was lovely on toast.

    I, too, was sympathetic that you had to eat the excess . . . poor thing!

    I love the idea of making lime curd and also lime drizzle cake. I’ve had the lemon drizzle cake, but not the lime. Something more to look forward to . . . And I’d never thought of freezing lemon or lime wedges for use in drinks. A great idea!

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