Fiddling with texture

My second twiddlemuff is complete. Again I used quite a lot of Scheepjes Softfun yarn, but I also included oddments of three pure cotton yarns (sunshine yellow, purple and an odd sort of pink/beige) and some cotton-rich bits that came, I think, originally from Jenny (Simply Hooked) a long, long time ago. Anyway, it’s nice and soft and easily washable and, yet again, I added some eyelash yarn so there was something fluffy to stroke and a pocket with a pompom on a string, plus a couple of crochet flowers, a crochet bobble that I found in my bag of scraps (I think it was originally a dragon nostril!), another pompom with sparkly bits and two firmly tied pieces of cotton tape that had once fastened a box of French chocolates.

Finally I rummaged through my button box. I focused this time specifically on finding different textures and selected:

  • a mother of pearl button with 4 holes, stitched on with a cross, for extra texture
  • a shiny, smooth button with a shank… one of the last buttons left from the first cardigan I ever knitted (about 40 years ago)
  • a black ridged button with a shank
  • a classic plastic button with a star indent
  • a green wooden heart

I actually pulled out more buttons than this originally, but the suggestion is that there are only about five items on the inside and five items on the outside, so I whittled my selection down a bit.

I really like this sort of scrappy project – it gives me the opportunity to work with bits and bobs that would otherwise probably remain languishing in a box or bag, plus it’s actually useful. I’m on a bit of a downer about how many scrap projects I see in various places that just convert one useless thing into a different useless, ugly thing…. and even worse, things that potentially spread problems further (plastic bag bunting, for example). I want to find ways to use scraps to make beautiful things, or useful things and that’s one of the reasons I’m always so inspired by the monthly ScrapHappy posts from everyone who joins in – long may you all continue to be so creative.

 

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27 Comments

  1. Very nice, and you raise a point for those whose busy hands always want to be knitting, crocheting, etc. What do you do with all that you make? Useful items for charities are the perfect solution.

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  2. Ann Pole

     /  April 9, 2019

    I’m totally with you, some of these ‘recycled’ crafts are utterly useless and unattractive too. Love what you are doing. 🙂

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  3. Hi! I have knitted in years. So I must ask, what is a twiddle
    muff? Lol at myself… but it’s cute what you have made.

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    • Twiddlemuffs are made to give to dementia patients – it gives them something safe to do with their hands. According to the NHS:
      A Twiddlemuff is a thick hand muff which has bits and bobs attached to the inside and out. It is designed to provide a stimulation activity for restless hands for patients with dementia.
      People with dementia may develop various restless behaviours such as fidgeting. Experts say that giving that person something to occupy their hands can benefit them. Twiddlemuffs provide a source of visual, tactile and sensory stimulation at the same time as keeping hands snug and warm.
      Twiddlemuffs have also been shown to have benefits for patients with learning disabilities and patients receiving chemotherapy. (https://www.sath.nhs.uk/wards-services/az-services/dementia/twiddlemuffs/)

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      • What an awesome innovation! I have a daughter with multiple mental health disabilities as well as being MMH. This would possibly give her a diversion! Thank you so much for sharing. I’m going to share your post on my blog.

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      • Can you knit these in the round? Seems like the only needles I’ve got let is a pair of chunky ones and a 10mm in the round?

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        • Yes, the ones I’ve done recently are crocheted, but in the past I’ve knitted several in the round – just make a tube and fold it in on itself. I fond it easier to attach the bits and pieces before folding it, as then you don’t have to worry about weaving the ends in as they just disappear between the two layers.

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          • I went to Walmart (kitting Shores too far away) and went ahead and got some knitting needles. Maybe this will spark my interest once again. I will send you a picture when I get it done 😊

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  4. I hope when I have dementia someone will make me something with buttons and bobbles and smooth and fluffy textures. Especially the fluffy… And you don’t need to worry about ScrapHappy ending any time soon. We’ve been going for years, and there are enough scraps in the world to continue until the end of time 🙂 I just wish more people who *don’t* work in fabrics would join in too, I love the variety.

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    • It’s proved rather difficult to get non-fabric people(so to speak) I know to join in, although there is a bit more diversity now. I keep asking people, just in case they get inspired. My actual ScrapHappy post this month will be mixed media.

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      • How exciting! I keep looking around for things to make from all the scrap building stuff we have around the place; one of these days I’ll be posting a shelf we’re going to build in the loo, made from a scrap of kitchen benchtop!

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    • Kate, I’ve been meaning to join in for years – but somehow never quite get it together to do so. It’s a great initiative and I so enjoy reading the posts from those I follow who do join in….

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      • Pauline, if you have things to show from before, there’s nothing to stop you posting them now! And if you’d like to join in from time to time, send me your email address using the info on my Contact Me page, and I’ll add you to the list of people I send a reminder to a few days before the post is due.

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  5. I love these muffs and I’ve put making them onto my do do list for when all the other plans are under control. The elderly home that Siddy visits would love them.

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  6. It’s a great idea, and thanks for the link.Using up scraps to make something that will give comfort to someone else = Win! I love making things, but I am often put off by wondering what to do with the finished thing. I have made crocheted squares and then donated the rugs to the local nursing home, but that takes a while. These muffs would be much quicker to make.

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    • I’ve made lots of blankets in the past, but you are right that they take a while to do. It’s been very gratifying to get a couple of these done so quickly and they will be off in the post next time I go to the post office. A quick feel-good project for me and a bit more left-over yarn out of the house.

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  7. This is the first time I’ve seen a twiddlemuff and it’s a wonderful idea. Love those buttons too. What good work you do, in so many ways!

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  8. Great stuff! Plus, I’m always so pleased when I can find a use for a dragon nostril.

    Liked by 1 person

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  1. TwiddleMuffs - Southern Prairie Girl
  2. And another (scrappy) thing | The Snail of Happiness

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