Church 1 : Council 0

Saint Deiniol’s Church in Hawarden in Flintshire boasts the most beautiful churchyard in the spring. First come the snowdrops, then come the daffodils and finally the bluebells arrive, accompanied by a host of other wild flowers. This glorious succession is allowed to progress and is available for all to enjoy. Not until all these flowers have finished is the area cut, thus ensuring that woody species don’t encroach and the cycle will be maintained.

Just across the road, are the two council cemeteries, where the grass is mown to within an inch of its life.

I certainly know which I (and the wildlife) prefer.

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22 Comments

  1. Since mowing costs money it is presumably cheaper to let the grass grow. Win, win, win! I remember as a small child being enchanted by lawns with daisies in and asking my Dad, who spent hours and a fair bit of money keeping his lawn perfect, why we couldn’t have daisies in ours. He was not amused! I still think I was right.

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  2. Ann Pole

     /  May 7, 2019

    Your churchyard looks lovely.

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  3. It’s almost a shame they don’t send some sheep in to graze it down; they’d contribute some nice organic fertiliser, spread any seed further and possibly carry some away with them to spread elsewhere… A much nice place to spend your eternal rest, I feel.

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  4. That’s such a ‘council’ thing to do – if you know what I mean.

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    • It really is, isn’t it. And, like Sue says, it costs money to mow, but not doing it gives you lovely flowers. Amazingly blinkered thinking.

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    • Patricia Collins

       /  May 9, 2019

      Isn’t it just, but until our Snail pointed it out, I’d never made the comparison. Thank you for opening my eyes.

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  5. I love your churchyard, with its range of beautiful meadow flowers. Better than the plastic flowers that would be the only ones that grow over the road.

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    • Oh yes. There were a few plastic flowers even in the churchyard, but they looked gaudy and quite ugly compared to the natural beauty around them. I didn’t photograph them, not wanting to highlight any particular grave or cause offense. If it was me, I’d just want that riot of nature.

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  6. Murtagh's Meadow

     /  May 8, 2019

    Would you mind if i use these examples when i give presentations to Community Groups in my area. It really highlights what can be achieved with a little thought.

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  7. It really is beautiful. Just tall grass is lovely, even without the flowers. People do have a passion for their lawns, though. I think grass is the largest domestic crop…

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    • My mother’s lawn is full of violets… when a neighbour wondered why theirs wasn’t so pretty, my mum suggested that if they, perhaps, stopped spraying in with “weed and feed” it might help!

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      • LOL. No doubt right. We have them all over the lawn here, too, until the first mowing, which luckily is after their glory days.

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  8. I’m with you! I love the wild look of the flowers in the tall grass. So sad the council doesn’t get it.

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  9. Our local authority has planted roundabouts and verges with wildflowers for a few years now and it’s been very popular. No more regimented flower beds! And it saves money that can be used elsewhere. Win win 😁

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  10. Pushing up the daisies is the expression but any other wild flower will do!!!

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  11. To that, I say a hearty “Amen!” And I love the sign.

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    • I entered the churchyard from the adjoining garden, so it wasn’t until I was leaving that I saw the sign at the official entrance… I just had to photograph it.

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