New year, New skill

Happy New Year, dear readers.

Sadly the beginning of 2021 has been a bit of a damp squib… we are lockdown again, with no end in sight. Trying to look on the bright side, this means I should have plenty of opportunity to do lots of creative things, including sewing some of the new fabrics I have bought recently. And, of course, I have lots of yarn to keep me occupied. At the beginning of the year I completed a ScrapHappy project, so you’ll have to wait a few days to see that and then I wondered what to do next. There’s a WIP that I’d like to get finished, but it didn’t inspire me, so I turned to my latest Little Box of Crochet and a new technique therein, namely Tunisian crochet.

Tunisian crochet is something I’ve wondered about for a while. It looked to me like a cross between knitting and crochet and I wasn’t sure that it was worth bothering with. However, when you are presented with all the equipment (well, actually just a strange crochet hook that has a cable on the end) and instructions, it’s time to dive in. In fact, it turns out that it’s just crochet in rows with stitches kept on the hook on alternate rows. You work back and forth always with the right side facing.

I’ve surprised myself by rather enjoying making this cowl and I will certainly be exploring Tunisian crochet further and following Natalie, the designer, who blogs at Detroit Knots and has some interesting patterns for sale.

So, have you tried anything new so far this new year?

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37 Comments

  1. Ooh! That looks nice….
    Well I accepted a crochet challenge from a lovely friend, (I learn to crocket, she learns to sew). I spent more hours than I really wanted to going through several youtube videos (Thank you to the lady who referred me to one such video, – I still failed!) trying to teach me to crochet. I managed the first row, but when trying to add the next row (double crochet?), that’s when things (consistently, and every time) went wrong. Just looks like a pile of mating worms!! So I conceded defeat, and asked myself why I wanted to learn to crochet in the first place.
    Aside from it being a useful skill to know, I had a surplus of lovely Inkpot wool that I wanted to use. I had already bought a couple of balls of the lovely dark grey to complement the delightful pale grey I already had. I’d thought of making a poncho for a while, so decided that as I can knit – basic stitches only I’ll have you know…. I’d be better to just knit the poncho instead of tying myself in knots (literally) trying to crochet. I’ve no idea how to add a photo on here, but I have done 5 of the 9 squares needed, including the middle one.

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    • Brilliant. When I see you, I will teach you to crochet – it’s such a good way to make hats and other things ‘in the round’ and I’m sure you would enjoy it if you could get the hang of it. Mind you, it took me over 30 years to learn… and youtube videos really didn’t help at all!

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  2. Reminds me of fruit salads.

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  3. Very pretty! And all my creative projects revolve around writing, with a podcast being in the works. 😉

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  4. I learnt Tunisian crochet in an afternoon workshop but just one yarn per row. Haven’t tried to make anything though. Yours looks really pretty and much more interesting.

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    • It’s deceptive – there actually is only one per row, but you work down into the row below on alternate stitches, so it looks as if there are two colours on the same row. Once it’s finished, I’m going to investigate what else is possible.

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  5. Aaargh! Head exploding! Knitting and crochet alone are scary enough, but *combining* them? Lost in admiration. And I love the colours you’re using, like fruit salad! Also looking forward to seeing what you have for us on ScrapHappy Day. Nothing new from me; just more dressmaking, lots of mending, etc. Hopefully I’ll also have something nice – and new – to show on the 15th.

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    • I have piles of dressmaking to get on with, but have been stymied by a lack of bobbins. Normally I would just pop out and buy a few more if I needed a new colour, but I have run out and no shops are open, so I’m awaiting an ebay order.
      As for the Tunisian crochet, it’s a bit confusing to begin with but once I’d got my head around the principle of it, it was quite relaxing (well, for me). I love the colours too, although I don’t think I would have put them together… these kits are certainly providing me with inspiration and pushing my boundaries a little, which I really do need at the moment.

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  6. Never tried that type of crochet – and now I’ve got too many hand problems to successfully do anything with one such tool. I can manage knitting but basically best with a circular needle. I’m “making something” now, not sure when it will get finished as my “concentration to do anything” is having a severe breakdown…. (off to see GP Wednesday – she must know the secret to – get better).

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  7. Happy new year, Jan! And wow, your Tunisian project looks great! If you’re wanting to continue your forays into this technique (and with all these lockdowns, sure what else would you be doing?) might I point you in the direction of my buddy Aoibhe Ni? We used to teach together and Tunisian crochet is her specialty. Her website is https://yarntowers.com/and you’ll find her on all the usual social networks too. Hopefully you’ll see something to inspire your next project!
    Meanwhile, I’m trying to level up with computer drawing programs. I think I’m getting the hang of it at last but it’s been slow going!

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  8. Very nice. I love your description – I think the hook/cable thing looks odd to pick up and use! Not tempted to give it a go yet, but shall admire your progress from afar.

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  9. that’s an example of how colours can work fabulously together. I never think of peach or anything with an orange hue, but that is so perfectly cheering. Thank you. And @polesparadise – I learned to crochet this year by using a combo of simple patterns that had a chart as well as a written pattern, and BellaCoco youtube tutorials. The pattern was the Nature’s Walk blanket, many of which are available for free. I’m addicted now.

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    • I’m a bit conservative when it comes to colours, but I’ve decided this year to have a go with ones that I normally wouldn’t choose. I have, therefore, just started work on a sludgy green jumper… the colour is called “Swamp Thing”!

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  10. I’ve been tempted to try Tunisian crochet in the past but probably won’t try anything new this year at least because, by the time I get sorted with the house and back to spending any significant time doing anything creative, all my old pursuits will seem new again.

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    • To be honest, it’s not all that much different from normal crochet… you just keep some stitches on the hook on alternate rows, so I think if you fancy trying it, it wouldn’t be too taxing,

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  11. I have heard of tunisian crochet but never tried it – it looks interesting and I like the colours. Those boxes seem to have been a good choice when we are restricted in so many ways.

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  12. Your site web is beautiful, congratulations 👍🌻🍂

    paintdigi.com

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  13. It’s a great cowl. I’ve never tried my hand at Tunisian crochet, always good to try something new 🙂

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  14. I love the look of this. I once saw someone doing Tunisian crochet at a conference, and have wondered how to get started. Are there any online tutorials you’d particularly recommend? I found that Attic24 was brilliant at getting me re-acquainted with crochet, which I hadn’t done for the intervening almost 50 years.
    Happy new year to you, a little late I know

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    • Since this came as a kit, all the instructions were included, so I’m not sure of any online resources. Actually, if you can already crochet, I think you’d pick it up quite quickly from some simple written instructions.

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