A different virus

A few weeks ago I felt the need for a new and challenging project and so I decided to embark on knitting a Fair Isle beret. The wool is from the wonderful Jamieson’s of Shetland, who produce the most astonishing range of colours. All was going well, until I noticed some discomfort in my elbow, which got more severe over a couple of days, and certainly felt worse when I was knitting. I think that I was probably holding the work quite firmly and the small needles were increasing the tension in my muscles. Feeling glum, I put my work to one side to return to once my arm started feeling better.

Clearly knitting was not an option, so I thought I’d do some crochet. The one ongoing crochet project requires additional wool supplies and I didn’t want to have to buy anything, so I had a think and realised that there was a pattern I’ve wanted to try for ages, for which I had the ideal yarn in my stash. A few years ago I bought a yarn cake with a colour gradation from purple through grey to black. When I got it home I realised that what I had thought was cotton was actually a cotton acrylic mix, which saddened me because I really do try to avoid buying plastic yarn. Because of my disappointment, I put it way in a drawer and have not, until now, felt inspired to get it out. However, in the spirit of using up what I have, out it has come and, despite the plastic content, it is actually a great yarn for the current project, which is called The Virus Shawl. Now, this pattern predates covid, but it does seem strangely apt.

The colour change is currently quite subtle, but will be much bolder as it moves from the pale grey to black, I think the finished shawl will be really striking.

Anyway, my elbow is now recovered and I feel able to return, at least for a short time each day, to knitting. There may be a beret to share some time in the future, but I’m not going to overdo it and now I’ve started, I’d rather like to get this particular virus finished.

Leave a comment

22 Comments

  1. Beautiful pattern and color, even if the material was not quite what you would have liked. Glad the elbow is better, but best to take it easy. The beret is off to a beautiful start.

    Like

    Reply
  2. Gee whizz, that really is a beautiful pattern. And definitely a most unfortunate name, given the current state of things. If I was the designer I’d change it!
    Hope your elbow is fully recovered πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. Beautiful shawl!

    I had a quick look at the Shetland yarn link and may well come back to this company if I want yarn without spinning it myself first.

    Like

    Reply
    • You can basically get whatever colour you want from Jamieson’s – I think they have over 200. My friend with a wool shop once had someone come in and complain that she didn’t stock all of Jamieson’s colours. She had to explain that if she did, there would be no room for any other yarn, but they were still disgruntled.

      Like

      Reply
  4. I have always liked the look of the Virus shawl and I imagine it must be a relaxing soothing project. Should look good in that yarn. At least a beret is a small project so even doing it in small chunks it should soon be finished. Look forward to seeing both of them.

    Like

    Reply
  5. Sorry to hear about the elbow. These things can take a while to heal so you might want to line up some more crochet projects. πŸ˜‰
    I made the Virus shawl a while back and, as predicted in my blog post at the time, have never worn it as I’m not really a ‘shawl person’. I have worn it as a scarf a couple of time though so all was not lost. I just had a beautiful Scheepjes Whirl to use and wasn’t sure what else to do with it.

    Like

    Reply
  6. At the back of my mind, I can hear Magnus Magnusson: “I’ve started, so I’ll finish”. The beret will be lovely, but you need to set a timer and only work for an hour or so at a time. Otherwise the elbow will come back to haunt you. And I speak as someone whose poorly-healed, many-times-rolled and sprained, never-rested ankle has now come back to bite her on the bum with a vengeance. Rest . That . Elbow. And if you decide you don’t want that scarf, I bet it would get snapped up in a flash if you offered it for sale – it’s beautiful.

    Like

    Reply
  7. Hope your elbow recovers soon. Virus shawl? Why that name, I wonder. Anyhow, it looks lovely. Thing is with a shawl, you rarely, if ever, need to wash it, so that will help mitigate the plastic content. πŸ™‚ X

    Like

    Reply
    • Yes, that was in my mind about the plastic fibre.. originally I had intended to make a short-sleeved top, which would have been washed regularly. Never mind, I’m enjoying the make anyway.

      Like

      Reply
  8. I love the shawl, even if it is made with acrylic mix. I am glad you are being sensible with your elbow. There is such a temptation to think “One more row”, which turns out to be a lot more than one row! Slow and steady.

    Like

    Reply
  9. love the varying shades in your “cake” I think people still buy such cakes as I often see them in my LYS (not been there for some months) and even with the acrylic mix you will know it will wash up well, maybe it won’t block as well, but time will tell…

    yes take it easy with your elbow…

    Like

    Reply
  10. Love The Pattern You Are Creating With Crochet With Beautiful Colors Yarn. Like To See When You Completed The Shawl. And Take Care Of Your Elbow. Good Luck For Your Work.

    Like

    Reply
  11. While recovering from an injury back in the 90’s I crocheted some things to pass the time. I was not near as good as you. Nice!

    Like

    Reply

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: