Currant Affairs

Whilst not quite as prolific as last year, the redcurrants have fruited well in 2021. I’m not a particular fan of blackcurrants, but the red ones I do like – both to accompany game and with yoghurt for breakfast. The vast number that appear all in one go makes it essential to preserve them and, unless I want a large part of my freezer entirely filled with the things, the answer is bottling. Actually, I like bottled fruit because it’s instant – at least when it comes to serving it. The preparation takes a little while, but redcurrants are an ideal candidate for bottling because they are nice and acidic, so preserve well.

Once picked (quite a time-consuming activity), they have to be stripped from their stalks (I use a fork) and any debris removed. This year, I still had some fruit left in the freezer from pervious harvests, so I bottled that with most of the current currant crop and put about a kilo of raw, fresh fruit in the freezer to use in baking in the coming year.

I simply cook the cleaned fruit with a bit of sugar – no need to add water, it’s juicy enough – then ladle into hot Kilner jars. Once the lids have been screwed down, the jars go into a water bath for about 25 minutes. Seals form once the jars are out and cooling, and the crop can then feed me for the coming year.

Redcurrants are one of my favourite things to grow and preserve – they aren’t particularly demanding in the garden and they bottle easily and successfully. I just wish all my crops were this easy!

Leave a comment

14 Comments

  1. YUM! 🙂

    Like

    Reply
  2. Looking lovely in those jars. Maybe I should try that instead of giving then away but, then, I prefer blackcurrants to redcurrants so we’ve made jam from those at least.

    Like

    Reply
  3. “… the current currant crop”, heheheh! Currants are all yours, ma’am, I don’t care for them at all. If you were bottling gooseberries, now, I’d be crying salty tears of envy because they’re rare in Australia and ungrowable in the tropics, and I love them.

    Like

    Reply
  4. Interesting that you prefer redcurrants to blackcurrants because I am quite the opposite. My mother used to bottle all sorts of fruit, not currants I think though. You certainly look as if you now have a good supply for the coming year.

    Like

    Reply
  5. Going Batty in Wales

     /  August 2, 2021

    As usual the birds got my redcurrants as fast as they ripened so I only got one picking of them. I need more bushes!

    Like

    Reply
  6. You are more diligent than me! I freeze any I can’t eat fresh, loose on a tray, then box them up, and usually jelly them. I just can’t be a*sed to top and tail fruit unless I absolutely must – but I do find it’s heaps easier if the berries are frozen. I’ haven’t tried bottling. I might do that next year. Thank you.

    Like

    Reply
  7. I remember my late SIL and her side room, full of all kinds of preserves and then her opening up jars to have in winter puddings. My late mother made the odd jams and marmalade but it wasn’t truly necessary as SIL had enough to feed an army. I’ve never made anything like that, a couple of things in the freezer, the odd jam – but never really had much success…

    Like

    Reply

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: