ScrapHappy April 2019

Last month I was really inspired by Alys’ ScrapHappy greetings cards, so this month I decided to have a go myself. I have loads of card blanks and piles of scrap paper and fabric. I’d also got a 2018 calendar that I couldn’t bring myself to throw out, some old greetings cards and some bits and pieces left over from the days when I used to make a hundred or so Christmas cards to send every year.

I started simple with some glue, paper scraps and the old calendar. The first one I made was a bit messy and I applied  my glue unevenly, so it came out a bit wrinkled. Never mind, it’s a learning process and I was very pleased with my final attempt on the yellow card.

I made several just with paper and then moved on to some including paper, fabric (some swatches from when I was choosing curtains some time ago) and some leaf skeletons that have been hanging around for ages:

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Fabric and leaves on paper

And then I decided to add some stitching, using my sewing machine. I made three cards from scraps of fabric, including some leaf motifs from an old net curtain, having become rather taken with leaves by this point. These are fabric on fabric, plus one leaf skeleton, mounted on card. The one on the left incorporates lots of the tiny trimmings from all the other cards, thus using scraps from scraps.

Finally, I had a little play around with sewing a leaf skeleton onto paper. This was an experiment and I haven’t actually made this into a card, but here it is anyway:

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leaf stitched onto paper

So, here’s the complete set of scrappy cards (except one, which has already been sent):

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scrappy cards

So, thank you Alys for the inspiration, I’m sure I’ll be making many more.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate,  Tall Tales from Chiconia. On the fifteenth of every month lots of other folks often publish a ScrapHappy post, do check them out:

KateGun, TittiHeléneEvaSue, Nanette, Lynn, Lynda,
Birthe, Turid, Susan, Cathy, Debbierose, Tracy, Jill, Claire, Jan (me)Karen,
Moira, SandraLindaChrisNancy, Alys, Kerry, Claire, Jean, Johanna,
Joanne, Jon, HayleyDawn, Gwen, Connie and Bekki

If you fancy joining, contact Kate and she’ll add you to the list. It would be lovely to see more non-sewing posts, but any use of scraps is welcome.

And another (scrappy) thing

I can’t resist sharing this latest scrappy creation – a third twiddlemuff, this time made from a piece of abandoned crochet.

Ages ago, my friend Danielle gave me a piece of crochet she’d been working on, but which had gone rather wonky along the edges. Originally, I was going to frog it and use the yarn for some charity knitting or crochet, but I was reluctant to pull it apart when the only issue was the edges. Having finished my last twiddlemuff, it dawned on me that this lovely bright, stripy creation would be an ideal outer and that all I needed to do was stitch it into a tube to hide the edges and then make an inner layer.

Tucked away with in the same place, I found a crochet heart that I’d made when I was experimenting with a pattern and that came out too big for the project I was working on at the time, but was perfect for a little pocket now. So, a bit of blanket stitch, some crochet embellishment, a few more buttons from my box, a bit of unwanted ribbon and a piece of cord, some more scrappy yarn either donated or left over from old projects, and Danielle’s abandoned colourful stripes are transformed into another twiddlemuff:

That’s my last one for the time being, but I’m really pleased to have made use of some more “scrap”.

Fiddling with texture

My second twiddlemuff is complete. Again I used quite a lot of Scheepjes Softfun yarn, but I also included oddments of three pure cotton yarns (sunshine yellow, purple and an odd sort of pink/beige) and some cotton-rich bits that came, I think, originally from Jenny (Simply Hooked) a long, long time ago. Anyway, it’s nice and soft and easily washable and, yet again, I added some eyelash yarn so there was something fluffy to stroke and a pocket with a pompom on a string, plus a couple of crochet flowers, a crochet bobble that I found in my bag of scraps (I think it was originally a dragon nostril!), another pompom with sparkly bits and two firmly tied pieces of cotton tape that had once fastened a box of French chocolates.

Finally I rummaged through my button box. I focused this time specifically on finding different textures and selected:

  • a mother of pearl button with 4 holes, stitched on with a cross, for extra texture
  • a shiny, smooth button with a shank… one of the last buttons left from the first cardigan I ever knitted (about 40 years ago)
  • a black ridged button with a shank
  • a classic plastic button with a star indent
  • a green wooden heart

I actually pulled out more buttons than this originally, but the suggestion is that there are only about five items on the inside and five items on the outside, so I whittled my selection down a bit.

I really like this sort of scrappy project – it gives me the opportunity to work with bits and bobs that would otherwise probably remain languishing in a box or bag, plus it’s actually useful. I’m on a bit of a downer about how many scrap projects I see in various places that just convert one useless thing into a different useless, ugly thing…. and even worse, things that potentially spread problems further (plastic bag bunting, for example). I want to find ways to use scraps to make beautiful things, or useful things and that’s one of the reasons I’m always so inspired by the monthly ScrapHappy posts from everyone who joins in – long may you all continue to be so creative.

 

ScrapHappy Update

I simply can’t wait until next month to share my completed February ScrapHappy project with you. I used a pattern from etsy called the Carina Satchel and, apart from a few places where I scratched my head a bit, it all went quite smoothly. I took Kate‘s advice and used a denim/jeans needle and didn’t break a single one – thank you for that tip. In addition, I worked almost entirely using the walking foot on my sewing machine, which coped well with multiple layers and ‘sticky’ vinyl.

In the end I used a few new things: the hardware (a magnetic clasp, two D-rings, a slider and two swivel clips), some waistband interfacing (to make sure the strap was nice and tidy) and a small amount of ready-made piping (which I could have made myself, but decided to buy). Working with vinyl meant that the bag mostly couldn’t be pinned, because pins leave holes in the plastic, so I used the sewing clips that I’d bought specifically to use for bag-making. Of course these are going to be used time and again. All the fabric and most of the interfacing as well as the fleece, which helps to give structure, were scraps.

And here it is completed:

Now, I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t look at that and think ‘scrap’. I’m now on the look out for other old vinyl tablecloths, although I have lots more of that one to play with still.

ScrapHappy February 2019

This month’s ScrapHappy is very much a work in progress. Once I got used to the new/old sewing machine, I gave some thought to what I would like to make and the answer (as you have seen here and here) was bags. As a complete beginner with bags, I started off by buying a couple of kits, but now those are finished, I want to progress on to using up some of my old fabric, much of it left over from long-completed projects. However, I was also interested in working with charity shop finds. When I was trawling Aberystwyth, unsuccessfully as it turned out, for old handbags to cannibalise, I came across a very large vinyl-coated cotton tablecloth and thought that it might be a cheap and useful source of waterproof fabric. A bit of research later and I settled on using some of it to make a satchel (designed specifically with this sort of fabric in mind). However, I wanted this to be a scrappy project, so I found a nightdress that I made but hated and had only worn a couple of times, to use for the lining and some left-overs from my gardening apron for the strap and handle. Not only that, but I also found some very tatty, but salvageable interfacing to use, as well as part of a fleece blanket that my mum gave me after she had used some of it to make soft toys, but then decided that it wasn’t ideal.

So, all the main bits and bobs are scraps (or scrapped!):

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Old tablecloth (hearts), old nighty (spots), fleece blanket scraps (cream) and scraps left over from my gardening apron (dark)

I have had to buy some hardware, but I don’t mind a few new things in such a scrappy project:

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the new bits

So, now it’s all cut out, I’m ready to sew… wish me luck!

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

ScrapHappy January 2019

The arrival of the new sewing machine and the easy access to it because of it having it’s own cabinet has encouraged me to do a bit more sewing. A project that I have been considering for a while it what I’m going to refer to as ‘Frankenfabric’ – not patchwork, but a different way of using random scraps. So, over Christmas I finally got round to having a play.

First, I laid out a piece of robust cotton furnishing fabric that has been in my stash since I was about 16. Onto this I laid out random piece of fabric left over from cutting out patterns in the past (I think all the bits were cotton or viscose). I made no attempt to match colours or be artistic, I wanted it to be truly random:

A random assemblage

Next, I covered the whole thing with a piece of old net curtain and pinned everything together with lots and lots of pins:

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All held in place

And then I did lots of random stitching with my new sewing machine, gradually removing the pins as everything became secure:

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Starting sewing

And I finally ended up with a robust piece of multi-layered fabric:

I was interested to see what it was like to work with, so I dug out an old zip and made a little pencil case, lined with a scrap of fabric left over from making one of my aprons:

But I didn’t stop there. Once finished, you can see that I put a few pens in it… some of those that have accumulated round the house. If you read the comments following Patricia’s post about accumulating pens, you may have noticed that Sue mentioned that she has the opposite problem and can never find a pen around the house. So, I parceled it up, pens and all, and sent it to Sue.

Scrap fabric, scrap zip and scrap pens… altogether a very ScrapHappy January. Next I plan to use yarn ends between the layers and see what that looks like.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

ScrapHappy December 2018

A couple of months ago, whilst we were out for a walk, Sam got bitten by another dog. Sam was on her lead and the other dog escaped from his; she became defensive because he was charging towards her and he managed to sink his teeth in as I scooped her up out of the way. Fortunately there was only a single puncture wound, although it was deep. The following day I took her to the vets, where the wound was cleaned and she was given antibiotics (it appeared to be infected). Being a terrier, a “cone of shame” is not a viable option but still she was determined to lick the wound until all the fur came off, so I needed a different solution. Of course, Chez Snail we always look for a scrappy solution, and so I give you the doggy vest:

Not impressed, but better than a cone

It is made from three t-shirt sleeves (left over after making yarn from the t-shirt bodies), with holes for her front legs and tail. After the first night I realised that the bagginess at the back was allowing her access to the wound, so I added a popper to hold it closed:

I’m pleased to report that the vest worked a treat – it was soft and comfortable and, once the popper was added, she couldn’t get it off or access her wound and she is now completely healed and re-furred – a much better solution than a plastic cone.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ScrapHappy November 2018

Finally the blanket from the scraps left over from Sophie is finished (originally featured in ScrapHappy September). Actually, it also includes some other scraps and a few new balls just to get it up to size, along with some of the abundant Cambrian Mountains wool that I had squirreled away and which was perfect to frame the blanket.

As you can see, it’s got cute bobbles on the end edges and is currently being road bed tested by Sam and Daisy (it turns out that Daisy LOVES wool). Here they are modeling it along with the original Sophie:

The pattern suggested just joining the hexagons at the corners, and this is what I originally did, But I wasn’t happy with how loose this made the blanket, so I have crocheted each row of hexagons together, leaving only the adjacent hexagons in each row unattached. This gives it more strength and means it’s less likely to get accidentally damaged because of something getting caught through one of the many gaps.

There were about a million ends to weave in, but I have plans for all the little left-over bits… watch this space.

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just a few ends

And now it’s off to Reading to make Mr Snail’s flat feel a bit more like home and provide a virtual hug from me when he’s there all on his own.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ScrapHappy October 2018

Several years ago I came across a maker who I greatly admired. I looked at her work and I pondered whether I could emulate it, but in the end I decided that it was beyond me and that, therefore, if I got the opportunity, I would buy one of her creations. So, unusually, this month’s ScrapHappy post features a creation that is not my own.

Fwo weeks ago I managed to get to Yarndale (more on this in a future post) and finally to see the wonderful creations of  Sue Reed, The Woolly Pedlar for real. I was so captivated, that I completely forgot to take any pictures of her stall, so it you want to see more of her work, you’ll have to follow the link. Sue uses old knitwear as the raw material to make amazing dresses, shawls, ponchos, coats, hats and more. In Sue’s own words:

I take waste knitwear and create new pieces from it, saving it from landfill. Textile waste is a huge problem, and landfill sites are full of discarded textiles that could be upcycled into new things.

And this is the poncho I bought:

One of the things I love about Sue’s creations is that she can use damaged knitwear. Elbows of a sweater worn through? No problem, just use the bits that are still intact. Moths got your cardigan? Cut out the squares from between the holes. Her eye for colour is amazing, as are her quirky designs. What an inspirational ScrapHappy business she has created.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ScrapHappy September 2018

You may remember Sophie… which took up quite a bit of my time last year:

I bought new wool to make her, but there was rather a lot left over: perfect for a ScrapHappy project. So, with Mr Snail living away from home during the week (more on that in a future post) and him commenting that the flat he’s renting doesn’t entirely feel like home, I decided that a snuggly sofa blanket was needed. It’s not finished yet, but this is progress so far.

As well as the left-overs from Sophie there are a few balls from my stash. It’s all wool (with the exception of a tiny bit of silk in on blend) and almost all British; any that isn’t is old balls that I have no idea anymore of the origin. I’m planning to work on it until I have used up as much of the wool as possible and then edge it in the cream wool (Cambrian Mountains), of which I have quite a lot left on the cone I bought to make Sophie.

I think it will make Mr Snail’s flat feel a bit more like home and keep him warm on those cold winter nights… if I can just get it finished!

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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