ScrapHappy June

OK, OK, everyone else did their ScrapHappy posts last week, but events conspired against me and mine did not happen. That is not so say that I haven’t been working on a scrappy creation, just that it didn’t make it onto the blog.

In fact my current scrappy project is a continuation of one you have seen before – a blanket using old crochet squares and unwanted yarn given to me by Wild Daffodil. It has progressed from this:

to this:

and on to this by the beginning of this week:

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The outer squares and the edging were made from wool left over from some of my old projects and some from Freecycle. And I thought that might have to be it, as I’d almost come to the end of my brown/beige/green scraps. But, no! Someone in the 60 Million Trebles group has a load of old cones of wool and other 4-ply scraps and oddments and these are now on their way to me, so that this can be made into a full-sized blanket. I am really enjoying this collaborative effort and hoping that eventually it will keep someone warm and let them know that there are people in the world who care.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

ScrapHappy May

After my foray into sewing in April, this month’s ScrapHappy make takes us back to yarn, cotton yarn to be specific. My bag full of left-over cotton yarn was severely depleted by the stripy corner-to-corner blanket that I mostly made whilst on holiday:

Blanket from big scraps

But there were still piles and piles of partial balls of yarn left over. In my experience, the best way to use up small amounts of yarn is to make little granny squares. The centre can be made from a really short length and adds to the diversity and beauty of the finished creation. So far I’ve made 64 squares, and I’m getting close to the end of the yarn. I’m hoping to manage another eight, to make a 9 × 8 blanket:

I plan to use recycled cotton yarn to join all these little squares together. This represents other peoples scraps, even though it’s new to me. The finished blanket is destined to be donated to charity via Sixty Million Trebles.

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

Hearts and flowers… and penguins

After completing my eighth blanket for Sixty Million Trebles, I have decided to spend some time on other creations for a while. However, before I put the whole project to one side, I decided to use up some scraps and make some hearts and flowers to attach to tags aimed at publicising the project:

I’m off on my travels again this week, so will be distributing hearts and roses far and wide. I have a few to finish off before I go, though:

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Roses in the making

I would have finished them this afternoon had it not been for a request to do a quick test of a little pattern for Danielle at The Make-it Shop:

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Penguin pieces

I think I positioned the wings a bit wrong, so it looks more like a purple sparrow than a penguin, but he’s a jolly little chap no matter what:

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Happy penguin

It’s always fun testing out Danielle’s patterns.

Have you made anything frivolous recently?

ScrapHappy February

This month’s ScrapHappy make is another blanket for Sixty Million Trebles.

All the yarn, except that in the border, was left over from knitting socks. This means that this entire project was worked in scrap 4-ply yarn… so it took a lot of hours and amounts to 19,812 crochet stitches (i.e. “trebles”). I wanted to frame the square nicely, so I used some wool out of my stash that was unwanted.

Originally this yarn was destined for my beekeeper’s quilt, but I got bored with that, so I’m going to convert the completed hexagons into a “beekeepers garden bench cushion” and pretty much all the rest of the scrap yarn collection went into this blanket.

This is the third of my charity blankets for this year.

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) Scrap Happy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) Scrap Happy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

Scrap Happy January

This year I plan to make at least one item every month out of oddments/scraps. My first of the year was actually started (and blogged about) in 2016, but I finally finished it last night.

All the yarn, except that used to edge the squares and make the border, was from my pile of left-overs. I did buy some New Lanark British wool for the borders because I simply didn’t have enough of any one yarn available and I wanted some consistency, what with the squares (and rectangles) being so random.

I had fun trying out some new patterns and relaxing with some old ones, plus I was able to incorporate a few squares that I had left over from past projects (including two that had been given to me by my friend Ann). The colours were, of course, dictated by what was in my bag and were not always what I would have chosen, but it’s bright and cheerful, not to mention lovely and warm.

This is the first of my charity blankets for this year and it’s going to Knit for Peace, who will find it a good home . It’s completely the wrong dimensions for Sixty Million Trebles , so a blanket for them will be my next scrappy charity project, which actually I’ve already started:

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just beginning

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) Scrap Happy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) Scrap Happy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

New technique, old yarn

I find it very easy to get set in my ways and never more so than when I’m knitting or crocheting. It’s so easy to pick up yarn and needles/hook and embark on a familiar pattern or stitch without really thinking, so I’m always pleased when something comes along that gives me a bit of a shove. One such thing was the Sixty Million Trebles (SMT) project, for which lots of the participants are making ‘corner to corner’ blankets. These blankets are made using a technique I hadn’t encountered before, but I noticed that it was described in my new crochet squares book, so I decided to give it a go. It turns out that it’s very easy and really fun to do, and it looks rather nice when done:

I have been working on projects recently all aimed at using up yarn that I have left over from past work or that has been given to me, but I still have quite a lot of that I want to get through, so I’m planning a corner-to-corner square for SMT using random yarn… I’ll start a ball and carry on with it until it’s done (or I get bored with the colour), then join another and do the same. There will be no planning, no worrying about what goes, just randomness. If nothing else it will result in a warm blanket, and it may even look good too!

 -oOo-

If you can knit or crochet or stitch squares together (or raise funds), SMT is looking for more volunteers, here’s what it’s all about:

The UN at the end of 2015 estimated that there are approximately 60 million refugees Worldwide
Just think about that for a moment. That’s like the population of the UK being without a home
The objective of this group is huge and it’s two fold
We want to create a yarn blanket containing 60 million trebles to represent the 60 million refugees. #onestitchonelife
Then because we have gone that far we want to continue and create the largest yarn blanket the world has ever seen.
To create a yarn blanket with 60 million trebles or equivalent we need around 8,000 36 inch squares, to take it on to become the largest blanket in the world we need around 13,000…
This will be a blanket to represent everyone who cares about the millions who are homeless, stateless and on the move
Running alongside this we are going to be raising funds #onetreble1p. If we raised just 1p for every stitch that would be a massive amount of money.

There’s a Facebook group and an Instagram account and a web site with all the details. This is my little pile of SMT blankets so far:

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Five blankets so far, no yarn bought specially for them

ScrapHappy December

For some time now Kate and Gun have been hosting ScrapHappy each month – an opportunity to show off creations made using scraps. Most of those involved sew, and there’s a predominance of quilting, but when I mentioned my knitting and crochet using yarn oddments, Kate asked whether I’d like to join in. So, here is my first official ScrapHappy post…

Despite much effort going into making squares for Sixty Million Trebles (SMT), I still have lots of yarn left in my scrap bag:

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Random colours

Over the past week, rather than traditional granny squares like these (my first blanket for SMT):

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an earlier scrap blanket

I’ve been making these:

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stripy squares

The joy of this sort of square is that even small lengths of yarn can be used since the core of each requires a very small quantity. I started off using shades of the same or similar colours:

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feeling blue

But as I work through my bag I’m becoming progressively more random…

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a square in progress

I’ll draw the whole thing together by edging all of them in a single colour, but I’ll have to hunt through my stash and see what I’ve got enough of… I’m hopeful that I won’t have to buy any to complete this scrappy blanket.

Playing

Sometimes it’s good to play. So, after making some very specific items for particular reasons and to deadlines, I thought that I’d spend some time just playing with my crochet hook. I have piles and piles of yarn oddments to use up, so I’ve been trying out some new patterns and some old favourites:

They are various sizes and I plan to put them (and more) together quite randomly into a large blanket that I will donate to Knit for Peace, who can always find a good home for woolly items.

All the above are made of wool or acrylic, but I also have a bag of cotton yarn oddments. Because cotton isn’t stretchy, it doesn’t really belong in my planned blanket, so I thought I would have a go at a completely different type of square, with a view to putting lots of these together into a fancy shawl or throw. It’s not my best work, but this is what I made:

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cotton square

The design is from the book Connect the Shapes. I’m rather fond of this book, particularly because it’s spiral bound, so it stays open whilst you are working from it! In addition it includes both charts and written instructions, making complex patterns easier to follow.

Now I have another specific task to get on with, but the playing has been fun…

Scraptastic

The hats for my stall at the International Permaculture Convergence are coming along nicely… they are made of all sorts of ethical yarn: some organic, some frogged from old garments, some from Freecycle, some recycled, some new British wool… you get the picture:

A whole heap of hats in a whole heap of yarns

A whole heap of hats in a whole heap of yarns

However, it struck me that I should make a hat representing the permaculture principles. And so I did:

It’s made entirely from scraps of yarn left over from other projects, apart from the brim which is yarn from a frogged cardigan; and it’s reversible.

In case you are wondering, the twelve principles, as outlined by David Holmgren, are used to help design resilient human systems or objects that are sustainable and kind to the earth. They are as follows, with my hat as an example;

  • Observe and interact: I observed that I had been collecting yarn scraps for the past few years and decided to make creative use of those long enough to tie together. In addition, observation of the hat as I made it allowed me to create the shape without following a pattern.
  • Catch and store energy: Wearing a hat is a good way to stop heat (energy) loss and with its tufts, this hat provides good insulation by trapping a nice layer of insulating air. In addition, the energy embodied in this scrap yarn is being captured because it’s being used rather than discarded.
  • Obtain a yield: A hat where none existed before, plus the satisfaction of creating something from (almost) nothing.
  • Apply self-regulation and accept feedback: As with anything made without a pattern, this hat ‘evolved’ as I made it – I increased the number of stitches until it seemed to be the right size and decreased to get a nice snug brim. Whatever yarn you are working with, you have to respond to its characteristics.
  • Use and value renewable resources and services: As long as there are people using yarn, there will be left-over scraps; this provides a way to convert them into a useful and unique object.
  • Produce no waste: It’s all too easy to throw away left-over yarn, but this demonstrates that it can be put to good use. There were lots of scraps that were too small to tie together for this project, but those will be used in the future for stuffing. No Yarn was wasted in this hat, because the ends that in other projects get trimmed off have been retained as a feature of the hat.
  • Design from patterns to details: The overall plan (pattern) was to create a hat with yarn scraps. The details came as I tied the pieces together – varying the colours and lengths to create a unique pattern. The plan also involved making the hat reversible, so different details appear according to the side that is exposed to the world.
  • Integrate rather than segregate: It’s a whole mish-mash… integrating colours, textures, fibres.
  • Use small and slow solutions: I’ve been collecting the scraps for several years, so I won’t be able to make another with this gauge of yarn for some time yet, although I’m planning a chunky version because I probably have enough thick scraps to do that. Despite using ‘waste’ yarn, it took a longer time to make than a ‘normal’ hat because so many pieces of yarn had to be tied together.
  • Use and value diversity: I have rarely seen a more diverse hat!
  • Use edges and value the marginal: The end of each piece of yarn is an important feature of the hat – providing decoration and insulation. I think it may also be pretty ‘edgy’ as far as fashion goes!!
  • Creatively use and respond to change: The changes in colour and texture were used to create the ‘look’ of this hat… there will never be another one like it.

So, there you have it, a quick lesson in permaculture and a rather mad hat… It will be for sale at the IPC in September unless I get a better offer before then!

NEWSFLASH: IT HAS BEEN SOLD! SORTING OUT MORE SCRAPS FOR MORE HATS NOW.

Odds and ends

Modelling the new scarf on a dog walk today

Modelling the new scarf on a dog walk today

A busy week has come to an end… I spent yesterday teaching a statistics class, so poor Mr Snail got neglected and had to stay home and do chores (I couldn’t persuade him to come along and learn how to analyse simple comparative experiments using the t-test – I’ve no idea why!). But I was able to make up for it a little by finally being able to present him with his local, organic wool scarf. I’m rather pleased with the result and it’s done just in time for the weather to warm up.

It was the end of another project this week as the raffle that I organised to raise funds for Denmark Farm Conservation Centre finally came to an end and the draw was made on Thursday. A list of winners can be found here on the first blog post that I wrote today (now you know why this one is later than usual). Many thanks to all of you who bought tickets… I just wish you could all have won. I have now retired from my work as a trustee of Denmark Farm, and this was my last big contribution to their work for the time being.

A bouquet of scrunchies

A bouquet of scrunchies

So, what with one thing and another, I’ve not had time for many big creative projects and, instead, I have been enjoying making scrunchies from oddments of sock wool and other yarn ends. The collection is growing and will make a good display on a stall I think. I love making these because I don’t have a pattern – I just do whatever I feel like and so each one is unique.

The coming week is set to be less frantic, although Max is going to be groomed on Thursday and that can be a bit of an event (he’s not keen and I have to accompany him to deal with the temper tantrums). So, hopefully I will get to work on the water dragon destined for Ms Pauline. I might even manage to do some work on the long-neglected sofa covers. Plus, now that spring is in the air there are more seeds to plant… one of my all-time favourite occupations… happy days!

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