Gloop

In permaculture there is a saying that ‘every problem is a solution’. This doesn’t mean that problems solve themselves, just that it may be possible to get a positive out of a negative. And so it is in our garden.

A coating of gloop

A coating of gloop

Many months ago I wrote about the fact that our garden has no topsoil – it was removed (and no doubt sold on) when the house was built more than 20 years ago. This resulted in us having to build raised beds in which to grow our crops and even a raised area for the chickens to live on, but there are still parts of the garden that are at the lower level. Unfortunately, there is a field behind us that still has its topsoil, so when it rains heavily, guess where the water ends up? It has never got high enough to flood the house, but the garden does flood and we often have standing water on the patio. And once the water subsides, we are left with gloop.

Some work with my squeegee revealed the flagstones

Some work with my squeegee revealed the flagstones

After the weeks of rain we have experienced recently, there is abundant gloop, making any transit of the patio a risky affair. Footwear with a rugged tread is essential if one is to avoid slipping. Careful thought resulted in the conclusion, however, that what we have is a resource – it’s just in the wrong place. The gloop is, in fact, topsoil from the field behind, and topsoil is never to be sniffed at. So, this morning I went out with a squeegee and an old dustpan and scraped up quite a large quantity of the mud from the paving stones, making it much safer and more likely to dry out when we finally get a period without rain. And I transferred it onto one of the raised beds, where it will provide a substrate for vegetables… what a result!

Relocated gloop: much more useful on the raised beds

Relocated gloop: much more useful on the raised beds

-oOo-

p.s. if you want a prettier picture, there’s a new square on my Masterpiece page!

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