Gone but not forgotten

The route to so many interesting people.

The route to so many interesting people…. who are easy to lose

A few months ago I wrote a post expressing my sadness at the disappearance of a blog that I liked to read – The Great Dorset Vegetable Experiment. I was saddened that Yambean had decided not only to give up blogging when she and her husband sold their worldly goods and set off on a new adventure in their life, but that she deleted the entire blog. Still, at least I knew of her plans to travel and can imagine her having aย  great time in warmer climes.

Yesterday, however, I assimilated the fact that another great blog had disappeared, but this one without warning. Lovely Lonnie, The Belmont Rooster, has taken his blog down and disappeared from our community without warning. What a shame – he had a huge array of information about plants and their cultivation and wrote interesting posts on gardening, farming and community. I really hope that he’s alright, perhaps busy turning all his information into a book. If you are reading this Lonnie, I do wish you well and hope you decide to start blogging again in the future.

So, this is a repeat of my previous request… if you do decide to give up blogging, do consider leaving your blog up – perhaps with a message saying that it’s currently not active. And remember that, although we have never met, we are friends, we care about you and we will miss you if you go away.

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27 Comments

  1. Amen to that. Come back Lonnie, your many fans are missing you. Thank you, Jan, for this call out on behalf of all of us. Lonnie, how am I now going to classify my succulents, and with whom can I discuss the different species of impatiens noli-tangere? It seems to me that we all become important to each other through the free exchange of information, opinion and insight, and when a key member goes, the loss is felt throughout the network. So, it’s not farewell, Lonnie, I hope, but until the next time.

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  2. I second ( or Third) that.
    xx Hugs xx

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  3. I felt the same when one a bee keeping blog disappeared at very short notice. Must check to see if he is writing anything anywhere again now.

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  4. I too have searched and searched for Lonnie and the Belmont Rooster. Everything about him has been shut down, even his personal email. Lonnie writes about his life in a way which made me feel I had a connection with his life on the farm, with his parents. The investment he made in encouraging new blogs was considerable and I was so grateful for the time he took to notice my little blog and the efforts I made. We are all left feeling concerned and hoping he is ok and that it was nothing traumatic which made him disappear so suddenly.

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    • I can only echo what you say.
      I too tried to e-mail but without success, as I know several other people did.
      So, Lonnie, if you are reading this – we all miss you and woulds love to see you back in the world of the blog ๐Ÿ™‚

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  5. As one new to Bloggerland, I’m wondering if after a period of time, some bloggers need a ‘detox’, as social media in general, can become intense and all-encompassing. Perhaps these bloggers need to reconnect with the real, and tangible world. (I know some Aussie bloggers regularly disappear for a while).

    But as you say, it’s nice to know they’re going, when you like them and their valuable content. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • You are right – it is possible to get rather sucked into the whole thing.
      I’ve quite surprised how close it is possible to feel to someone who is thousands of miles away and who we only ‘know’ through the world of blogging.
      I’d like to think that if I decide I need a break, I’ll let you all know, though, so you don’t worry.

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  6. I think giving warning is a good thing (but may not be possible for everyone; sudden illness, accident or whatever). I’m going to give my access information to a trusted friend as a ‘just in case I am unable to blog’ precaution. Thanks for the warning. I’m re-blogging this, as I hope the bloggers that I feel are family (in some cases closer than family) will consider doing the same. I think if one has posted reference material, such as gardening or knitting information, it would be nice to leave the blog up until it no longer attracts any attention. But, that said, I know that stuff happens . . . here’s hoping none of my new friends suddenly vanishes.

    Oh, nearly forgot to mention; blogging can take a lot of time and sometimes it’s emotionally challenging; I see no problem in taking a break, but letting people know; and, if possible, letting them know an approximate time you will be back. ~ Linne

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    • I agree… I often find info on blogs that have not been updated for a year or two that is still useful and I’m grateful to have found.
      I read an interesting article a few months ago about digital legacies and the concept of ‘living on’ thorough your on-line presence even after death… I will try to track it down again.
      I’m sure most people ‘disappear’ through choice, but it is interesting to think about.

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  7. Reblogged this on A Random Harvest and commented:
    Please see my comment on this; I hope some of you will consider a ‘just in case’ backup plan, too. I have appreciated it very much when I’ve been informed of someone’s illness or need to take a break. ~ Linne

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  8. I have missed Lonnie too and wondered what happened to him. It’s everybody’s own choice to finish with blogging, remove if need be…it would just be nice to read a “so long” post and know at least they are ok.

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  9. So very true. When I don’t see posts from friends in the blogging world I worry that something has happened to them. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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  10. One wonders why a person would delete a garden blog! I recently read about a great big hoo ha on wordpress that resulted in some massive argy bargy in which at least two people removed their blogs, and one of them (the one I thought was in the right in the great battle) was able to bring hers back. A wordpress expert helped her, because at first she was told that once you delete, there is no bringing it back. But a garden blog, uncontroversial and educational and/or beautiful, is a benefit forever (big word) for all gardeners who happen upon it even if it has not been updated in months…What a shame!

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    • I guess we all have our reasons. Lonnie’s blog had loads of plant-related info and I do wonder whether he has decided to publish it; in which case I can understand not wanting it to be completely freely available on the blog. Mostly, though, I just worry on a personal level when a fellow blogger and friend disappears.:(

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  11. I took myself off Facebook a while back and the goodbye post was hard to write but important. Disappearing suddenly, well, iit can scare people. I hope Lonnie is alright.

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    • I do think it’s good to write a farewell post (hard though that may be, as you say), just so friends don’t worry. We all have good reasons for maintaining our online presence, or not, but through it we have often made great connections and I know that people really do care.

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  12. Good post. I have ‘lost” a couple of people too and it was a shock really. I hope they are OK. I think a short (or long) exit post would be great. ๐Ÿ™‚

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