Rare as hens’ eggs

Sunday waffle-making

It’s that time of year again when the ladies don’t lay much. That, coupled with the fact that none of our little flock is a spring chicken anymore, there haven’t been many eggs to be had for the past couple of months. Gone are the days of a poached egg every lunchtime and as many cakes as we could eat. Instead, there’s warming vegetable soup for lunch and what eggs there are are used for very specific things – waffles for Sunday brunch, for example. We could buy eggs, and occasionally we do, but the scarcity makes our home-produced eggs so much more precious and makes us so much more grateful for the abundance when they are ‘in season’.

9 Meals 9

a seasonal summer meal – now a distant memory

I like this seasonality of food. I know that, with enough money, it’s possible to have pretty much any sort of food at any time, but what’s the fun in that? How lovely it is to enjoy the first strawberries o the year – picked and eaten on the same day. What delights to see the sequence of British apples arriving in the shops in the autumn. What a pleasure to eat seasonal salad leaves, so that each season delivers a different set of flavours and textures. And eggs are the same in this house – plus the yolks change colour with the season, influenced by what the hens have been eating.

Eating seasonally is a fundamental way of connecting with natural cycles, plus it’s good for the environment.

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14 Comments

  1. I had no idea that the yolks changed colour through the seasons. Don’t blame your girls for having a rest.

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  2. We’re also trying to be more seasonal in our eating habits. It’s sometimes too easy to throw out-of-season items into the trolley though!

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  3. I do love my eggs… I think in your position, I’d be foregoing the waffles and having a nice boiled egg and buttered toast, so I could get that full eggy flavour πŸ˜‰

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  4. Totally agree with you about seasonal food. Yes, we do have salad leaves outside, but not many, so I’m saving them for Christmas day. I guess part of the problem with buying anything is that you don’t know what season it should be in. Yes, UK tomatoes are still available, but we wont go into the hows of that!
    Bless the girls for having a break.

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  5. I agree – food how it should be! πŸ™‚

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  6. My cousins eat pretty seasonally, so it’s been great this year. Asparagus daily until it was over, corn later on, berries and fruits as they came into season. And garden veggies the same. We did preserve a lot, as here where there is snow for months, it’s preserves or live on grains, etc. They do buy locally as much as possible, too. I’m so lucky they like veggies as much as I do!

    Eggs are naturally seasonal, I guess, but it’s hard when we use them for baking and the like. I could eat entirely seasonally, but doubt I’ll get quite to that. But for those things that I don’t eat year-round, like asparagus, they are certainly a treat when I do have them.

    Have a wonderful week, both of you. ~ Linne

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  7. You learn something new everyday – I suppose it makes sense that the yolks will be influenced by what the hens are eating – in much the same way as honey from different crops tastes different.

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  8. I hate seeing raspberries and strawberries in the store this time of year. Not only because I think they are things that are far more enjoyable fresh and local, but just the thought of the carbon footprint to hurry them up here from Mexico or SouthAmerica just makes my gut churn. We’ve been getting eggs from a local hen lady…obviously, the yolks are far tastier and deeper colored than “regular” eggs, but now I’m going to have to keep an eye on their changing colors!

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  9. Eating seasonally make us appreciate the seasons. Raspberries taste way better when you watch and wait for summer to arrive and the first berry ripens.

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