ScrapHappy April 2018 #1

Whilst I haven’t been blogging recently, I have been busy with other projects… several of which have involved scraps, so this is only the first of a couple of ScrapHappy posts this month.

Mr Snail spends most of his life wearing jeans, and he has a sort of hierarchy, from relatively new to ancient and only suitable for gardening/practical conservation work. I used to refuse to mend them, but my discovery of boro mending and my determination to keep as much stuff out of landfill as possible has encouraged me, in recent years, to regard the continued life of these jeans as a personal challenge.

Boro makes use of scraps of fabric behind the tear or hole to reinforce the garment and then lots of running stitches which form a visible mend and which rely on the additional fabric to act as a foundation. If the hole is big, or of you what to make a feature of it, it’s fine for the reinforcing fabric to show through. And it is this fabric that has been the destination of a variety of scraps. I’ve used several sorts of fabric, including some cotton jersey and we’ll see what works best.

First I repaired the seat of a pair of work jeans. The knees of these jeans had been patched with waterproof fabric (salvaged from a raincoat that the dog ate) a while ago and that has lasted well, but both sides of the seat area had split, so I used some scraps of checked cotton drill, edged using my overlocker, to repair these.

Next I moved on to some ‘everyday’ jeans. One knee of these had been mended twice previously, but the other knee was close to tearing and, again, the seat was worn through on one side… perhaps Mr Snail has been doing too much sitting down recently! This very odd pair of jeans is significantly darker on the inside than the outside – you’d never guess those were the same mends, would you?

All the fabric was small off-cuts from previous projects that otherwise could have been considered to be waste (too small even for dusters, which I made a few more of from some of Mr Snail’s old pyjamas last week).

Watch out for more scrappy activity soon!

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate, who provides links to other (mostly sewing) ScrapHappy bloggers at Tall Tales from Chiconia on the fifteenth of every month… do check them out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 Comments

  1. I think that technique makes an otherwise tedious chore a fun and arty endeavour! Being able to catch just the slightest glimpse of a colour or pattern peeking through a large mend is brilliant. And it so fits in with the fix-it movement and will add to its popularity too I think. I’d love to live to see the day when everyone is wearing artfully mended clothing!

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    • I have started to quite enjoy these mends… particularly when the garment already has several of them. I’m trying to be spontaneous about each mend and choose fabric and thread that appeal to me on the day rather than to match up with previous mends. Although it’s not scrap, the thread has been sitting in my sewing box for the last 30 years so it’s about time it got used too!

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  2. Brilliant! A double whammy today, not just using scraps beautifully, but also impressively attractive and multiple mends. In the very best ScrapHappy spirit 🙂

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  3. This is interesting, especially since I ripped the knee of a pair of pants last fall and have been cogitating on how best to repair it. It’s an odd tear, but I have a couple more ideas now.

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  4. The next step would be to mend Mr Snail’s jeans with the patches on the outside. That would “cuten up” everyone’s day…. 🙂

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  5. Love the foxy mends, makes me very scrap happy.

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  6. A great scraphappy entry. Are you using special Sashiko thread?

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  7. I’m impressed.

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  8. I like boro a lot–I haven’t done any, mind you, but I keep seeing it and thinking about it! And wasn’t that fox fabric also used in your knickers??

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  9. Laurie Graves

     /  April 15, 2018

    Great mending!

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  10. So good to read about mending – I hate this world we live in where everything seems to just be thrown away when it gets slightly damaged. Mends can become a feature ! Well done.

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  11. Well I fell down a rabbit hole there. Now I feel like a fair expert in boro mending and I’ve made my pledge to 1 Million Women to cut my carbon! I’ve come to like visible mending so I’m definitely up for giving boro a go.

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    • I think letting go of the idea of invisible mending has made a big difference to me. I also love the idea of doing my bit to save the planet with a needle and thread.

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  12. A mend a day keeps the landfill away! I love the cute little fox print. Well done, Jan.

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