ScrapHappy April 2020

A month down the line and how things have changed… I thought that this month there would be more scrappy cards, but events have overtaken us.

Instead, it’s all about face masks… perfect for using up scrap fabric. There are lots of patterns out there, but two different friends recommended the same pattern, so that’s the one I went for. Kate Chiconi wrote about it here and then, when we were chatting via Zoom, my friend Katie (who only lives a few miles away, but might as well be in Australia at the moment) modelled the one she had made from this same pattern. I have, however, added an extra component: non-woven Vilene. Although it’s not medical grade, adding Vilene increases filtration because it isn’t woven. If you are thinking of making a mask, you might be interested in the information in this post from the lovely people at Empress Mills which discusses suitable fabrics.

Anyway, when I mentioned to Mr Snail that I was going to make face masks, he said that he wanted to make his own, so this is our first joint ScrapHappy project, and you can read about his take on it here.

I started off by trialling the pattern and working out which parts might be a challenge for Mr Snail (none, as it turned out). I collected together some likely-looking fabric and in the end I made one mask from a scrap of organic cotton left over from an apron I made (outer) and some Tana Lawn (lining) and one from some snail fabric (outer) and some lovely soft cotton that had once been a pyjama leg (lining). The Vilene (applied to the lining fabric) was a variety of small pieces left over from dress-making projects and there was just enough for two face masks each. Mr Snail’s masks were also made of scraps, and I managed to find enough elastic in my sewing box to complete our projects.

-oOo-

I’ve been inspired to write this (and future) ScrapHappy posts by Kate,  Tall Tales from Chiconia. On the fifteenth of every month lots of folks often publish a ScrapHappy post, do check them out:

Kate (me!)Gun, TittiHelรฉneEvaSue, Nanette, Lynn, Lynda,
Birthe, Turid, Susan, Cathy, Debbierose, Tracy, Jill, Claire, Jan,
Moira, SandraLindaChrisNancyAlysKerryClaireJean,
Joanne, Jon, HayleyDawnGwen, Connie, Bekki, PaulineSue L,
Sunny and Kjerstin

If you fancy joining, contact Kate and she’ll add you to the list. It would be lovely to see more non-sewing posts, but any use of scraps is welcome.

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21 Comments

  1. I’ve used some scraps to make something similar to yours…

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  2. Great! I’ve also been running up a few masks, but of a much simpler design. Yours are spiffy – you could make two the same and join them together, and it looks like you’d have a great bra as well ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  3. Mine don’t have the Vilene but are made from two layers of batik, one on the straight and one on the cross grain. I’ve laundered them several times now and they seem to hold up just fine. I like the pattern we’ve both used because it’s tight around the face but is shaped so your nose doesn’t get squashed. I also find this design doesn’t steam up the glasses if correctly fitted, which is a bonus! I may give the Vilene a go, failing which I have some tear-away stabiliser, also non-woven, which might be a reasonable if rather stiff substitute.

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    • I was pleased with the Vilene suggestion, and it seems to work well. My friend Annette tells me that if you can blow a candle out through your face mask it isn’t working… I checked with mine and I didn’t even come close. Thanks for sharing the design in the first place – it does seem to do the job rather well and I’m pleased to be prepared for when they are needed.

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  4. I love that your one is themed especially for you ๐Ÿ˜ƒ

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  5. I’m resisting the whole mask thing at the moment but I’m afraid it is likely to become necessary for all trips outside eventually. Your masks look good – are they restrictive to breathe through?

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    • Since we are hardly venturing out at the moment we are currently not making use of them. We decided to make them, however, because we reckon that once the lockdown starts to be lifted, face masks will be compulsory (as in other countries).
      It does get a bit stuffy inside the mask and I wouldn’t like to have to wear one during vigorous exercise, but it’s not too bad for normal wear. Apparently, the test of effectiveness it that you shouldn’t be able to blow a candle out through your mask.

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  6. Very fetching! Well done Mr Snail – you are becoming very competent at sewing!

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  7. You two look quite snazzy in your masks. My husband, Clif, is the handy one in the family, and he has made a mask. When his ankle has recovered a bit, I will have him model it. I am actually thinking of using it when I spread ash on the gardens. Last spring I got a terrible sinus infection after I spread ash. I hope to avoid that this year.

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  8. Susan Nixon

     /  April 16, 2020

    Now that’s going to be a picture that puzzles future generations! Better label the backs of photos or write the story with a print out. LOL You look like fashion statements these days. =)

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